PL EN

Rabin Ozjasz Thon

Pic. National Digital Archives

Rabin Ozjasz Thon

On the centenary of Adam Mickiewicz’s birth

read
translated by Paulina Ohar-Zima
The entire Polish nation is currently giving fervent thanks to heavens, because a whole century has passed since the birth of the greatest Polish and one of greatest world poets, Adam Mickiewicz. You, Jewish children, who are pupils in Polish schools, where you may have already acquainted yourselves – or will do so – with elevated works of Adam Mickiewicz, you are also participating in this joyous and beautiful thanksgiving celebration.

What is and what should be Adam Mickiewicz to you? In the first place to all of you he should be a teacher, whose noble and upstanding teachings should guide you now, when you are still learning, and later on in your life. As once great prophets, so now God is sending inspired poets in times of misery and harsh fate of nations. Prophets and poets have the very same sacred – because given by God – task: to revive faith in men’s hearts and urge them to everything noble and good.
translated by Paulina Ohar-Zima
hide

Rabin Ozjasz Thon

Rabbi Ozjasz (Jehoshua Abraham) Thon (13 Feb 1870, Lviv – 11 Nov 1936, Kraków), one of the chief Zionist leaders in Western Małopolska, sociologist, philosopher, Member of the Polish Parliament (1919-1935), writer, one of the authors of the so-called Polish-Jewish agreement (1925). Apart from philosophy and sociology at University of Berlin, he also studied at the Higher Institute for Jewish Studies (Wissenschaft des Judentums) in Berlin (1891-97). Affiliated with Zionism since youth, he assisted in preparations for the First World Zionist Congress. Appointed the chief rabbi and preacher of the Tempel Synagogue in Kraków in 1897, he held this position till his death. He was famous for his fiery sermons, which were published in Polish in 1938. Deeply engaged in social activity, he established the Kraków Ezra Library, called “Little Jagiellonian Library;” co-founded and headed the Tarbut educational organization, daily Nowy Dziennik, and the Jewish Studies Institute in Warsaw. He published widely in Hebrew, Yiddish, German and Polish. He is buried at the Jewish cemetery at Miodowa St. 

see on map
Map
< go to main page